In the studio with Lilly

Recently, dull grey skies and strong winds have meant that I’ve been more tempted than usual to spend some time photographing indoors. A challenge on the filmwasters.com site to show six images of one subject from one roll of film gave me a spur to buy a bunch of lillies which I photographed over the period of a few days before and after Christmas.

The images that follow are a modified version of the filmwasters project, because I used two film backs to take some images on Rollei RPX25 film as well as my usual Kodak TMax 100. I had just one roll of RPX25 and wanted to try it out in a non-critical situation; if the shots didn’t work out then I would have the TMax versions as well.

My intention was to show the lillies in diifferent stages of the life cycle from before opening, to dying.

Rollei RPX25 film

After taking the above image, I cut some of the flower heads off (saving them in separate vases) because, once they open up, they are quite close together which makes it difficult to get a clear image of just one flower head.

Rollei RPX25 film

Rollei RPX25 film

The “studio” consists of a very cheap black backdrop on two vertical and one horizontal poles, draped over a table, and lit by one or two household anglepoise lamps. The lamp bulbs have been changed to daylight balance ones, but that’s not necessary for mono work.

All shots were taken with a Mamiya RZ67 and 110mm lens. For the images above and below, extension tubes were also used.

Kodak TMax 100 film

Kodak TMax 100 film

Kodak TMax 100 film

Kodak TMax 100 film

 

Rollei RPX25 film

Rollei RPX25 film

Rollei RPX25 film

Rollei RPX25 film

 

Rollei RPX25 film

Rollei RPX25 film

Kodak TMax 100 film

Kodak TMax 100 film

As I’ve only tried one roll (10 shots) of Rollei RPX 25 I’m not in a position to say much about how it compares with TMax. Obviously, it’s two stops slower, and in the dimly-lighted studio some of the exposures with RPX25 were 1 minute or more. The end results were broadly comparable with TMax 100 – they look nice but they’re not noticeably finer grain than TMax despite it being a slower film. The RPZ was more curly than the TMax and had a slight green tinge; TMax often has a pink tinge but I now fix for 5 minutes in Kodak TMax Fixer which gets rid of the pink.

Both films were developed in Kodak D-76 film developer. I’ve been using Kodak TMax developer recently, but couldn’t find a development time for that developer with RPX.

Due perhaps to economies of scale, RPX isn’t significantly cheaper than TMax in this part of the world. I don’t rule out using it again but will probably use up some more of my TMax stock in the freezer first.

You can see the contributions from other filmwasters members on the filmwasters.com site here.

 

 

 

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3 thoughts on “In the studio with Lilly

  1. fragglerocking January 9, 2015 at 9:15 pm Reply

    they look so classy.

  2. Jim Grey January 10, 2015 at 1:43 pm Reply

    Great work!

  3. Allen Pinto January 11, 2015 at 10:25 pm Reply

    Nice pics.

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